Thank You, Deeply

Dear Women & Girls Community,

We are excited to share our plans for the future of women and girls’ coverage at News Deeply.

In January 2018, our Women & Girls page will close as we launch the first of a new set of dedicated platforms that will allow us to dive deeper into the biggest issues affecting women and girls in the developing world.

This first platform – Women’s Advancement Deeply – will cover the pursuit of economic equality for women, from securing gender-equal access to financial services, to fighting for property rights and closing the pay gap.

We’ll also be working to launch other dedicated platforms in this space, and we are currently exploring themes of maternal, sexual and reproductive health, as well as gender-based violence. If these topics are of interest to you, please let us know here – we would love your input as we shape new initiatives.

Our trove of existing Women & Girls coverage will remain available through an archived version of the site, allowing you to explore and reference our published articles dating back to May 2016

Thank you for being part of the Women & Girls community. We look forward to having you join us in our new endeavors in this space.

Sincerely,

Lara Setrakian, CEO and Co-founder, News Deeply
Megan Clement, Managing Editor, Women & Girls, News Deeply

The Refugee Teacher Helping Syrian Street Kids in Turkey

When Yasmin Al Dabaan fled the war in Syria and settled in Turkey, she noticed many Syrian children living on the streets. Using her teaching skills and her salary, she set up the Active Child Center and now provides children with informal lessons every afternoon.

Written by Rosie-Lyse Thompson Published on Read time Approx. 1 minutes

In 2015, Yasmin Al Dabaan fled the war in Syria and settled just across the border in Turkey, in the town of Reyhanli. One day, the single mother and teacher saw a Syrian refugee girl searching through a trashcan for food. That image inspired Dabaan to set up the Active Child Center, a place where street children could come to feel safe. At the center, children get informal lessons every afternoon. Every Friday, Dabaan cooks them a big meal. Her small teaching salary funds most of the center, and the rest comes from private donations.

Ultimately, Dabaan would like to see all the children attend a proper school, but many families are unable to afford the fees. So, she also helps parents find jobs, which means their children no longer have to work on the streets to help support their families.

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