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Arctic Deeply is designed to help you understand the complex web of environmental, social and economic issues in the High North. Our editors and expert contributors are working around the clock to bring you greater clarity and comprehensive coverage of Arctic issues.

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Thank You, Deeply

Dear Arctic Deeply Community,

As issues in the Arctic continue to evolve, as does news coverage of the region, we have decided to transition how we cover the Arctic as of September 15, 2017.

Ongoing Arctic coverage will be folded into our newest platform, Oceans Deeply, on a dedicated channel. You can sign up for the Oceans Deeply newsletter here.

Our trove of Arctic news will remain available through an archived version of the site, allowing you to explore and reference our published articles since December 2015.

We are currently exploring the creation of a community platform focused on Indigenous Life, in the Arctic and in diverse communities around the world. If that platform is of interest to you, please let us know below – we would love your input as we shape this initiative.

Thank you for being part of the Arctic Deeply community.

Sincerely,

Lara Setrakian, CEO and Co-Founder, News Deeply
Todd Woody, Executive Editor, Environment, News Deeply

Roundup: The Best of Arctic Deeply 2016

From food security to Inuit activism, from tourism to natural resource development, here are the 10 stories you read, shared and engaged with most in the past year.

Written by Hannah Hoag, John Thompson Published on Read time Approx. 4 minutes
View from nuuk fiord1
A view from the Nuuk fjord in Greenland (CC BY-SA 3.0).Wikimedia/Nanopixi

Arctic Deeply’s most-read stories for 2016 were often about the wrenching social and environmental challenges that Arctic residents face. More often than not, however, these stories were also about solutions to these issues being created and advanced by the people living in the North themselves.

Among our top stories were ones about making country food more easily available in Nunavut, designing a better kind of house for Nunavik and a push to turn more Saami into scientists. Other stories sketch out how northern countries could further benefit from tourism or build cheaper icebreakers.

Special mention should go to our ongoing “Emerging Leaders” series, which puts the spotlight on the 16 bright young minds that we expect to influence the future of the Arctic. The introduction to this series attracted more attention than anything else we’ve published in the past year. Keep watching our website in the weeks to come as we release the rest of these profiles, and thanks for reading.

Joe Hess is the manager of Nunavut Country Food in Iqaluit. Hess sells a variety of country food, including dried Arctic char, or pitsi, which he says is very popular. (Alexander Kim)

Joe Hess is the manager of Nunavut Country Food in Iqaluit. Hess sells a variety of country food, including dried Arctic char, or pitsi, which he says is very popular. (Alexander Kim)

Tackling the Culture Clash Over Country Food in Nunavut

Buying and selling country food could help support the territory’s hunters and strengthen its very poor food security, but the practice conflicts with the Inuit tradition of sharing.

FAA to Pilots: Do Not Disturb the Walrus

As sea ice declines, thousands of Pacific walrus are hauling out along the Alaskan coast, where low-flying aircraft can spook herds and trigger deadly stampedes. The Federal Aviation Administration hopes to change that.

The Rise of Inuit Activism in a Changing Arctic

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is one of the toughest, most influential Inuit activists in Canada. Her perspective on the effects of toxic chemicals and climate change on the Arctic have transformed the issues of science, politics and economics into those of human rights.

Biologists estimate that 100,000 walruses hauled out along the 20km (12-mile) coastline of Cape Serdtse­Kamen’ between August and November 2009. (Russian Academy of Sciences/Anatoly Kochnev)

Biologists estimate that 100,000 walruses hauled out along the 20km (12-mile) coastline of Cape Serdtse­Kamen’ between August and November 2009. (Russian Academy of Sciences/Anatoly Kochnev)

Canada’s Arctic an Untapped Gold Mine … of Tourism

Foreign tourists helped Iceland back on its feet after its economy bottomed out. Canada’s Arctic is just as stunning and culturally rich, but it still lacks easy transportation, hotels and other amenities for tourism to give the region an economic boost.

Arctic House Design Saves Energy and Embraces Inuit Culture

A lack of safe and affordable housing threatens the health and well-being of thousands of Inuit living in Canada. But the construction of an energy-efficient, culturally mindful home could break ground on finding new Inuit-led solutions to the housing crisis.

The Saami University That Creates Indigenous Scientists

The Saami University of Applied Sciences takes a holistic approach to education that reflects traditional Saami livelihoods and culture. This Indigenous-led research is vital in a changing Arctic, says Saami Council leader Gunn-Britt Retter.

Students engage in land-based learning at the Dechinta Bush University home campus in the traditional territory of the Yellowknives Dene, Chief Drygeese Territory/Northwest Territories. (Dechinta Bush University Centre for Research and Learning)

Students engage in land-based learning at the Dechinta Bush University home campus in the traditional territory of the Yellowknives Dene, Chief Drygeese Territory/Northwest Territories. (Dechinta Bush University Centre for Research and Learning)

As Greenland Ramps Up Mining, Who Will Benefit?

With its newly accessible onshore and offshore mineral wealth sought by companies spanning the globe, mining developments remain a controversial topic in Greenland. At the heart of the debate is whether the boom will benefit or exploit the job-hungry local population.

A Better Way to Build Icebreakers

Why pay more than $1 billion for a new icebreaker when it costs $150 million to make one in Finland – and where they are used for only part of the year? Canada, the U.S. and Finland could share these vessels, a joint venture that would increase the number of much-needed ice-ready ships in the changing Arctic.

Putting the North Into Northern Research

Everyone agrees that Indigenous people should be more involved in Arctic research. However, there are still few Indigenous researchers. Erin Freeland Ballantyne, a founder and the dean of the Dechinta Bush University in Yellowknife, N.T., is trying to change that.

Sixteen Young Leaders Who Will Influence the Future of the Arctic

Meet the people who stand apart when it comes to improving education, fighting climate change, boosting international collaboration and revitalizing Indigenous culture in the Arctic. They are the ones we’ll be watching in the years to come.

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